obligation vs. rationalization

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Chris Huntley
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obligation vs. rationalization

Postby Chris Huntley » May 30, 2008 11:21 am

ralph18 -- obligation vs. rationalization

I need some help attempting to understand how the variations (issue) work. As I understand it this is the thematic exploration. Is this a spectrum of values across a range? If so how is obligation on one end and rationalization on the other? I am unclear what one has to do with the other.

Ralph


Chris Huntley Re: obligation vs. rationalization #1

The range between Rationalization and Obligation goes between Internal justification and external justification. Neither deal with problems directly.

Rationalizations mask problems by internally justifying excuses for not dealing directly with problems ("I'm too upset to deal with this right now," or, "I'd love to go with you--I need a break from this right now").

Obligations mask problems by externally justifying excuses for not dealing directly with problems ("I promised Joe I'd take care of this so I can't help you right now," or, "My mom said I have to stay and clean my room before I can play").

The biggest thing that makes a difference between Rationalization and Obligation is PERSPECTIVE. From the inside it looks like one. From the outside it looks like the other. THAT's why they're a dynamic pair to be explored. Which perspective is more advantageous or disadvantageous? How do the dynamics between the two thematic variations play in a thematic conflict. Only the AUTHOR provides the "objective" perspective. YOU, as author, say which is the more appropriate way to interpret the subject matter: Rationalization or Obligation.

Chris Huntley
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ralph18 rationalization vs. obligation #2

Chris,
Thanks for clarifying that however I am still a bit confused. In the theory book the example of Morality vs. Self Interest is given as a thematic range. On one end of the spectrum you have self interest at the cost of morality or immoral behavior while on the other end you have moral behavior at the cost of self interest. This a range between two extremes. However rationalization and obligation as you describe them seem like two ways of viewing the same problem of justification.

Ralph


Chris Huntley Re: rationalization vs. obligation #3

Self Interest vs. Morality is an "inside/outside" contrast just as Rationalization vs. Obligation. Rationalizing doesn't include the external considerations, just as Self Interest lacks consideration of others. Obligation doesn't take into account personal issues, just as Morality lacks consideration of self.

Note that the perspective I AM taking is an objective, disinterested, third-party point of view. I am NOT stepping INTO those perspectives but viewing them coolly from the outside. Even when I refer to "consideration of self," I'm talking about someone ELSE considering himself.

The difference between the two dynamic pairs is the subject matter. Rationalization and Obligation seem to describe the process of (problems with) justification (hiding problems from oneself). Self Interest and Morality seem to describe the process of (problems with) complications growing from desire for something. Those are WAY limited and somewhat inaccurate descriptions/definitions but I hope you see my point.

Chris Huntley
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phillybudd
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Re: obligation vs. rationalization

Postby phillybudd » Nov 05, 2010 4:53 pm

Chris, not sure if you're still answering question to this archive forum, but... would it be safe to say, then, that this inside/outside perspective applies to all dynamic pairs? I've been spending a lot of time with the book again but don't remember this point being made anywhere.

Jeff

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Re: obligation vs. rationalization

Postby Chris Huntley » Nov 11, 2010 10:22 am

Yes and no. I think it might be better to say that the differential between them works that way, but you cannot assume which is the more objective view and which is the more subjective view without looking at the specifics. It's actually more complicated than that, but the objective/subjective (outside/inside) analogy or perspective can be useful in understanding the differences between two items in a dynamic pair.
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phillybudd
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Re: obligation vs. rationalization

Postby phillybudd » Nov 17, 2010 4:38 am

Got it, thanks.


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