autobiogrpahy

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Chris Huntley
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autobiogrpahy

Postby Chris Huntley » May 30, 2008 9:55 am

abbevans -- autobiogrpahy

I have ordered Dramatica Pro 4 and hope to use it to write my autobiography. Will this software be right for autobiographies? or just screen plays? Please help.
abbevans@cox.net


karen4227 Re: autobiogrpahy #1

I think you would be surprised at how much this software will help your creativity. Even when you have most of the background in your head already. It poses great questions.

Karen



Chris Huntley RE: Autobiography #2

Like Karen said, I think Dramatica has a lot to offer you in writing your autobiography.

Dramatica is designed to help you find (or create or impose) meaning in your story. The more you conform to the Dramatica storyform (the underlying structure and dynamics of your story), the more clear the meaning of your story/autobiography will be to your audience.

Since it is arguable that "real life" doesn't have any "objective" meaning, it is up to you as author to give the record of your "real life" autobiography a context within which meaning may be found. The more you believe your autobiography has a meaning, the more you'll want to follow the Dramatica storyform.

This is not, by any means, and either/or choice. You can choose to stray beyond the bounds of Dramatica's storyform if you want. Just be aware that the more you do so, the more difficult it will be for your audience to find an overall meaning to your life's story.

Biographers, and autobiographers in particular, always struggle to find the balance between describing events "the way they happened" (which has no particular higher meaning), with the desire to describe events within a context established by the author (which is designed to give the events meaning). That's the balance you'll have to find in the telling of your own story.
Chris Huntley
Write Brothers Inc.
http://dramatica.com/
http://screenplay.com/

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