DRAMATICA AND LYRIC WRITING?

Discuss the practical use of Dramatica. Have questions about how throughlines should be used, how to create Complex Characters or even the various combinations of the 12 Essential Questions and how they will affect your story go here.
clefort

DRAMATICA AND LYRIC WRITING?

Postby clefort » Jul 30, 2008 8:51 am

Hello ALL, :?:

My name is Clinton LeFort. I live in Union, Mo. I am a composer/Lyricist. I'm working on a lyric presently called "I FOUND YOU AGAIN;'
It is about a person who is searching for self-awareness. Here are the STORY-ENGINE SETTINGS:

% STORY ENGINE SETTINGS: "I FELT LOVED AGAIN"
% RESOLVE: Change [14,35,53,]
% IC RESOLVE: Steadfast [5]
% GROWTH: Start : LINE 46,[13,33,51,69] "TIDES OF DOUBT ROLLED AWAY"
% APPROACH: Be-er : LINE 17,37,55,(74-76) -"I FELT LOVED AGAIN"
% PROBLEM-SOLVING STYLE: Intuitive :LINES 42-45
% DRIVER: Action : LINE [71,72
% LIMIT: Timelock LINE: 54 "WHEN LOVED SEARCHED ME OUT"
% OUTCOME: Failure LINE : 3,4,6, [13,33,51,69] [43,44,45]
% JUDGMENT: Good :LINE [14,34,52,70],5,24,25,61,46

This is the first verse followed by the prechorus. The Prechorus is supposed to lead upto the Chorus. Does anyone know of any examples where the MC is speaking to the IC who is a supernatural being. In this case it is God. Georges Polti in "The thirty-Six Dramatic Situations" refers to this dramatic story as SUPPLICATION. I interpret the steadfast character -GOD- or IC- as a stable light of hope for the MC who is seeking self-awareness. The problem stems form using each verse as an act, and developing the conflict and resolution and change for the MC. In Dramatica what would between act be called and how does the screenwriter bring in new material between acts. I think it may be like flash forward or flash backwards, something like Orwell did in Rosebud at the beginning.

Any leads would be appreciated.

Clint LeFort

VERSE ONE

[1.] NIGHT AND DAY I SOUGHT OUT YOUR LOVE [A] (I WAS)
[2.] SEDUCED AND SWAYED BY WINDS OF CHANCE [A]
[3.] YOUR FAITHFULNESS ANCHORED ME, AND I KNEW [B]
[4.] DEEP, THE PAIN, OF LOSING YOU [B]

PRECHORUS

[5.] YOUR ETERNAL LOVE MADE ADVANCES
[6.] MY HEART'S LONGING WOULD NOT CEASE UNTIL

CHORUS

[7.] TIDES OF DOUBT ROLLED A WAY
[8.] SEAS OF KINDNESS POURED IN
[9.] GRACED MOUNTAINS, ROSE HIGH AND CLEAR
[10.] I FELT LOVED AGAIN

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Chris Huntley
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Re: DRAMATICA AND LYRIC WRITING?

Postby Chris Huntley » Feb 26, 2009 2:28 pm

Hi Clinton --

I'm not a lyricist, but I'm fascinated by your application of Dramatica to lyric writing. The material between acts is often related to the story Driver (Actions or Decisions). This may be similar to the function of a chorus, since it is consistent but not always the same.

Then again, that just may be coincidence. :D
Chris Huntley
Write Brothers Inc.
http://dramatica.com/
http://screenplay.com/

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Re: DRAMATICA AND LYRIC WRITING?

Postby dietelco » Jun 16, 2009 8:02 am

Dear Chris,

could we work out how does music, wardrobe, & setting act like "fifth characters" in tv & movies?

I mean, have you seen the version of "The Merchant of Venice" with Al Pacino in it? EVERYTHING in it was gorgeous!

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Re: DRAMATICA AND LYRIC WRITING?

Postby Chris Huntley » Jun 17, 2009 4:00 pm

Costumes, set dressing, music, makeup, effects, and all other storytelling techniques usually help explore the thematic side of a story. They COULD work as characters if they fulfilled character functions, such as a T-Shirt whose front message changed to provide input:

Code: Select all

EXT. MACY'S DISPLAY WINDOW - NIGHT

Sam paces back and forth, unaware of the mannikin with the
plain green T-shirt standing in the window behind him.

                         SAM
          What do I do?  Do I ask her
          or not?

Sam's attention is drawn to the mannikin.  The T-shirt now has
a saying on it.  "What Would Jesus Do?"

                         SAM
          Good question...what IS the
          right thing to do?

Sam starts. 

                         SAM
          Wha...?   

The T-shirt front now says: "Do The Right Thing!"
He looks around him and then back at the shirt.

                         SAM
          Uh...I suppose I should...um...
          marry her?

T-shirt: "Just Do It!"

Sam nods to himself, takes one last look around,
then heads back to the subway entrance. 


Lame as the example may be, I used the T-shirt to (literally) express the position of the Guardian (conscience) character.

You may illustrate your storyform in any way you want, especially if you are not overly concerned about your audience's acceptance of unusual storytelling.
Chris Huntley
Write Brothers Inc.
http://dramatica.com/
http://screenplay.com/


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