So who's right?

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Teresa
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So who's right?

Postby Teresa » Jul 14, 2011 5:10 am

Okay,

I've sent my script to two editors and the formatting corrections were different. Being writers we're self-taught so my questions are:
1. Scene line - when moving from one scene to another, and it's continuous do you write ex. INT. LOBBY - CONTINUOUS ? Or just INT. LOBBY?
2. One editor taught us that if you wish to bring attention to a sound you capitalize. Ex. A sudden PUFF of wind rushes through the open windows. The drapes FLAP and SNAP.

While the other editor is telling me no capitals. So who's right?

Also - anyone know where I can get my hands on the script to The Secret of My Success (Michael J Fox) Another way I'm teaching myself is reading scripts, see what is written and visualizing. I've already checked out Simply Scripts and Scripts-0-rama and neither has it.

thank you, Tree

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Chris Huntley
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Re: So who's right?

Postby Chris Huntley » Jul 14, 2011 2:31 pm

Generally speaking, you should NOT use CONTINUOUS unless it is necessary. It is assumed that activities flow in real time unless you indicate otherwise through the scene heading time of day, the scene description or dialogue. If your switch of locations/scenes seems to indicate a time jump when there isn't one, you might want to use CONTINUOUS in the scene heading, but only use it when you have to. It is better to ere by not using CONTINUOUS than overusing them.

As far as capitalizing sound effects goes, I am old school and do not recommend it in a spec script. If you are being paid to write it, get a sample or don't worry about it. Capitalizing sound effects is a production-centric feature. HOWEVER, in the book, "The Hollywood Standard," Christopher Riley says that you SHOULD capitalize sound effects.

I hope other writers weigh in on this to give you some greater perspective.
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Havel
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Re: So who's right?

Postby Havel » Apr 10, 2012 8:11 am

If two editors have got it confused, you can be sure two readers will have it confused too.

The best general rule for all these sorts of things is CLARITY.

It's not the rule/convention so much as the ease of understanding that matters.

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Chris Huntley
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Re: So who's right?

Postby Chris Huntley » Apr 11, 2012 9:54 am

I completely agree.
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Write Brothers Inc.
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SadieRobertson

Re: So who's right?

Postby SadieRobertson » Feb 08, 2013 8:09 pm

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